Tracing Rizal’s footsteps at Fort Santiago

This is the ugliest month of the year so far. No excitement, no thrill, no new acquaintances. But I cannot blame anyone for that. I prefer to stay at home for now, so I’ll save enough money for my next escapades. 😉 I celebrate the days working, and the weekends blogging and watching ‘Forevermore’ and reading. This morning, I came across a nice article on Huffington Post. It’s 47 things someone in her 40s learned about life.

I like them all but here’s one of my favorites: “People will make time for you if you’re important to them. And they pretty much won’t if you’re not.” So stop all the fuzz when someone takes you for granted. Stop wasting your energy for people who don’t really care for you. 🙂

Instead, use that energy blogging. haha Here’s Part 3 of my tour with friends and sisters around the historic Walled City of Intramuros. If you miss Part 1: Intramuros, Manila 1, and Part 2: Intramuros, Manila 2.

My beautiful sisters
My beautiful sisters

And since I have mentioned a lot of things already about Intramuros, I will just focus on one of its attraction, Fort Santiago. This defense fortress was named after Saint James the Great. James is Santiago in Spanish. The high walls are 22 feet in height, and 8 feet in width, while the main gateway is 40 feet in height. The fort is surrounded by a moat connected to Pasig River.

Before reaching the Fort, there’s Plaza Moriones with historic monuments and beautiful gardens.

Plaza Moriones
Plaza Moriones
Creating a drama scene with a Spanish prayle/priest XD
Creating a drama scene with a Spanish prayle/priest XD
My sister and ..
My sister and ..
Well 3x
Well 3x

Ready to explore Fort Santiago?

Fort Santiago
Fort Santiago
Slide5
My sister tracing Rizal’s footsteps
Rizal in his cell
Rizal in his cell

Behind the main gateway is an exhibition of Dr. Rizal’s last moments before his execution in 1896. Many victims of war were also imprisoned in the dark dungeons of the fort.

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Slide9

 

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Due to the fort’s strategic location, it served as an important national landmark. Before it was built as the present Fort Santiago by the Spaniards in 1571, it was a palisaded fort of Rajah Sulayman of the Muslim Manila.

The Pasig River
The Pasig River
The Fort overlooking Manila across the Pasig River
The Fort overlooking Manila across the Pasig River

To give more of the Spanish era-  feels, there are guards (guardia civil) stationed at Fort Santiago. It was just a little bit disappointing that unlike the royal guards in Europe who are always alert and disciplined, the guards scattered at the fort were lazing around during our visit. I remember one sleeping on a bench and one busy with his phone. They didn’t even greet visitors. 😛 Maybe it’s just the service-oriented me. But don’t they have a napping area? It just looks weird that they’re wearing the guardia civil suit but don’t act like one. hahaha

Spot the busy guardia civil:

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Entrance to Fort Santiago is not for free. The last time we were there, it was P75 for adults and P50 for students. And same tip: Be careful of your things.

Jose Rizal's bust?
Jose Rizal’s bust?

So there. I hope you’d find Intramuros an interesting place to visit! See you on my next entry! ♥

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2 thoughts on “Tracing Rizal’s footsteps at Fort Santiago

  1. The last time I went here was during one of my field trips in high school. It’s always good to know your history, and I’ve learned way more in that field trip rather than the days I sat in class and tried to absorb what the history teacher is giving us. I say tried cause I really suck at history. During the time of the field trip, the guardia civil are quite attentive, and it made me sad that the guys here are fiddling with their phones. XD

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