Copenhagen, Denmark: A Walking Tour

Last time, I wrote an entry about Copenhagen: Carlsberg Byen, Freetown Christiania, Tivoli, Rådhuspladsen, Nyhavn, The Opera House, Amalienborg Slot, Anglican Church of St. Alban, Kastellet, and the Little Mermaid. If you missed it, click Take me to Copenhagen!, Freetown Christiania and Skål! Exploring Carlsberg Byen in Copenhagen. While I have covered a lot of famous landmarks in the previous posts, there are still some I have missed and will write about in this entry.

First stop: Strøget (Walking Street) and the Rundetaarn (The Round Tower)

The Walking Street is the longest shopping street in Europe. It is car free, and during summer, throngs of people can be seen scattered along the area. The Danes especially love to sunbathe in the middle of the plaza, or in any place where there’s a bench or two.

Amagertorv
Amagertorv

“Strøget, popularly known as the Walking Street, is the oldest and longest shopping street in Europe. Established in 1962, this car-free zone is lined with shops (including famous brands), restos and landmarks. It’s one of our favorite hangout spots in Copenhagen, not only for window-shopping but also for getting a glimpse of street performances. Just imagine sitting on a bench at Amagertorv (below) listening to a talented man play the piano and watching passersby from all parts of the globe. Nothing makes a Saturday aftie lovelier!” (2014, photodiary)

Street performer
Street performer
Street performers
Street performers
Busy shoppers
Busy shoppers

On the Walking Street stands a popular structure in Denmark: the Round Tower. Built between 1637 and 1642 by Christian IV, the tower is a unique building without an elevator. so visitors can only climb up using the 209 meter long Spiral Walk. The Tower also houses an old library with approximately 10,000 books, a bell loft for the Church of the Trinity, and a Planetarium. To make it short, the Round Tower is the oldest functioning astronomy observatory in Europe which offers a magnificent panorama view of Copenhagen.

Climbing up is no joke, so make sure to pause for a while and enjoy the view outside.

My sister and I on the way to the top!
My sister and I on the way to the top!
Pause
Pause

The view on top was astounding! Unfortunately, my camera was not. So pardon..

Copenhagen
Copenhagen

On your way down, you can stop by the library hall, exhibitions, floating glass floor and souvenir shops.

Woot!
Woot!

Entrance fee is 25DKK for adults and 5DKK for children (5-15 y/o). For more info: http://www.rundetaarn.dk/en

Second stop: Rosenborg Slot/ Rosenborg Castle

Not far from the Rundetaarn is another building project of Christian IV, the Rosenborg Castle.

Spring and summer
Spring and summer
My sister by the moat surrounding the castle
My sister by the moat surrounding the castle

The castle follows the Dutch Renaissance style, and was finished in 1624. Christian IV named his “House in the Garden” the Rosenborg Castle. According to sources, the castle was a Royal Residence until 1710, when Frederik IV made it the setting for the Royal collections.

I particularly love this Castle and its beautiful garden in summer. Everyone is free to spend some quiet moments in the garden, read a book, have a picnic, take a nap, etc.

Rawr!
Rawr!

My friends and I were just strolling around the city, so we did not stop and see what’s inside the castle. But if you plan to explore Rosenborg and its Museum: http://dkks.dk/visit-us/. The lions at the gate are waiting for you. 😉

Third stop: Copenhagen Botanical Garden

A couple of blocks away from Rosenborg is the University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden and Museum, simply known as the Copenhagen Botanical Garden. It is part of the University’s Natural History Museum of Denmark.

My aunt and I
My aunt and I

“The garden contains the largest collection of living plants and also holds three gene banks. The garden is affiliated to the largest danish herbaria collections with plants and fungi, and is furthermore linked to the central library for botanical literature in Denmark, Botanisk Centralbibliotek.” (http://botanik.snm.ku.dk/english/) Free entrance!

I loved the huge greenhouse. It smelled like tropical Philippines somehow. 😉

My sister and I inside the green house
My sister and I inside the green house

There you have it– a 1-day itinerary for a lovely walking tour in Copenhagen. I hope the links help. 😉 Now, back to listening to OPM (Original Pilipino Music). I’m getting hooked to rock these days (4Non Blondes, Green Day, Linkin Park, Cranberries, etc), but OPM is still the best! Ciao-ciao and enjoy Copen-heaven! 😉

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One thought on “Copenhagen, Denmark: A Walking Tour

  1. I did several walking tours in Copenhagen but my most favorite was the last one I did alone a few months ago. I also went to the Botanisk Have. I wish I went to the botanical garden a couple of months earlier so there would be more blooms though. Then again, it’s still pretty as it is. Pinagpawisan ako ng bongga sa loob ng greenhouse. I’m going to write a blog post about it pretty soon.

    Liked by 1 person

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