Visiting the Drammen Museum on a cold winter day ❅❅❅

Woot! It’s winter in Norway! After a harsh negative °C temperature for the past couple of weeks, the weather is gradually shifting to a more bearable state of >0°C. That means taking a “spasertur” is once again possible and enjoyable!

This spasertur, however, is not geared towards the Norwegian woods, but on to a museum complex found in Drammen, the capital city of the Buskerud County.  I have been to many museums, and I have my favorites. Drammen Museum, nevertheless, has its own charm. Why? Because I wasn’t alone during the visit (it was a date <3), it wasn’t an academic requirement, and most importantly, the museum consists of several buildings and parks scattered all over the city!

Welcome to Drammen Museum - Marienlyst park!
Welcome to Drammen Museum – Marienlyst park!

The Drammen Museum is actually a foundation consisting of the Drammen Museum in Marienlyst built in 1908, the Drammen Art Society founded in 1867, the Gulskogen Farm established in 1959, the Thaulow collection of art and curiosities, the Austad Farm, and the Open-Air Museum located on top of the historic Spiraltoppen.

It was a lovely walking tour for my bf and I, although we visited only a part of the complex, specifically, the Marienlyst Museum park, which features a country villa from the late 1700s, some timber buildings and courtyards from Hallingdal, and the Lyche Pavilion established in 1990.

Drammen Museum, the villa from the late 1700s
Drammen Museum, the villa from the late 1700s
Timber houses and courtyard from Hallingdal
Timber houses and courtyard from Hallingdal

Inside the country villa are “permanent collections of Nøstetangeglass, Baroque silver, ceramics from the 1700s, furniture, textiles, interiors, religious and folk art”, and the permanent art and design collection.

Table setting from the 1700s
Table setting from the 1700s
A drinking ox horn from 1892
A drinking ox horn from 1892
A "soveværelse" (bedroom) from the early 1900s
A “soveværelse” (bedroom) from the early 1900s

One of the interesting displays in the museum is this huge doll house from the late 1800s. It belongs to the three daughters of Lars Alfsen Ødegaard, and was used through four succeeding generations. I can’t really imagine playing with porcelain dolls. I bet those dolls can only sleep, brush its hair, and wear fancy dresses. My barbie dolls could swim, fly, crash on thorny bushes! haha

A doll house from the late 1800s
A doll house from the late 1800s
Some fancy drinking glasses
Some fancy drinking glasses

It is also fascinating to see how religion evolved in Norway. Just like in PH, it was mixed with ancient religions like paganism and naturalism. We were in a Lutheran Church once and saw a Viking ship hanging on the ceiling. The ship is a unique feature of stave churches in Norway, and they somehow created a symbolism for it — sailing thru life, something like that. The same ship structure was hanging on the ceiling of the St. Laurentius Catholic Church in Drammen.

Here are some religious artifacts found in the museum:

Coffins
Coffins

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Bridal treasure chests
Bridal treasure chests

Along the corridor and on the walls surrounding the main staircase are art and design collections, created by both local and foreign artists.

An ancient sled
An ancient sled
A magnificent glass chandelier created by American artist, Dale Chihuly, in 2012
A magnificent glass chandelier created by American artist, Dale Chihuly, in 2012
A magnificent glass chandelier created by American artist, Dale Chihuly, in 2012
A magnificent glass chandelier created by American artist, Dale Chihuly, in 2012

Adjacent to the villa is the new Lyche Pavilion, which houses a cafe, the museum shop, and temporary art and crafts exhibitions.

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Hopefully, we will manage to visit the other parts of the museum complex. And hopefully, this is the first of the many museum dates. 😉 Drammen is a beautiful river city, and I’m quite certain it will be more and more interesting as summer approaches. Lykke til, alle sammen!

For prices and visiting hours: http://drammens.museum.no/besok/priser-og-apningstider

Cheers from cold, cold Norway!

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17 thoughts on “Visiting the Drammen Museum on a cold winter day ❅❅❅

  1. We have a similar museum in my city with extremely beautiful wax statues and ornaments from the past. If you come to Pakistan, definitely visit the Lok VIsa in Islamabad.

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  2. Its overwhelming to see that kind of table setting. Amazing place and structures. Havent been in europe and seeing these photos are amazing

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  3. I do not think I would like to visit a museum with creepy dolls and black coffins in the dead cold of winter! But those snow scenes you took outside the museum look so great. – Fred

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  4. Aaah, I would love to own one of those bridal treasure chests. They are lovely! In their culture, are these given with stuff inside?

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    1. Thanks for the comment! Well, my bf said they are given to the bride filled with stuff that she would need in life as a wife. And the size corresponds to the economic and social status of the groom. 🙂

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  5. Whooo… Its all covered with snow!!!! The places one can visit in winter, really does come down with all garden & forests & parks looking dry. Museum looks awesome and that drinking horn is very intriguing!!!

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  6. Hey there, great pictures. Looks like a nice place but I can only imagine how cold it must be and yes, some of the stuff look a bit creepy. lol There’s something with dolls that just creeps me out. lol Great post tho. I love visiting museums as well. Always a unique experience and you always learn something new even if the information is old. lol

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  7. I love visiting museums. You learn a lot from a country’s history when you do. The doll house and the coffins creep me out a little, though!

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